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Taugan
08-30-2006, 04:43 PM
My first two resin models will be here within a week (I hope - note to all - don't buy from a guy called HobbyWarrior on Ebay - 2 weeks with no sign of my kits - then they are broken, so he has to find different ones, then he ships them with the longest air carrier possible, etc, etc...).

I was wondering a few things. With the plastic models I used to make you had to prime them before you paint them. Do you still prime resin models? If there are chips or broken pieces - is the model lost - or can you fix it somehow? Sanding and that sort of thing? What kind of sand paper? Sorry that I'm a complete newb at this. lol.

Any tips or suggestions for a new modeler would be appreciated. Thanks.

Taugan

Arieanna
08-30-2006, 06:04 PM
My first two resin models will be here within a week (I hope - note to all - don't buy from a guy called HobbyWarrior on Ebay - 2 weeks with no sign of my kits - then they are broken, so he has to find different ones, then he ships them with the longest air carrier possible, etc, etc...).

I was wondering a few things. With the plastic models I used to make you had to prime them before you paint them. Do you still prime resin models? If there are chips or broken pieces - is the model lost - or can you fix it somehow? Sanding and that sort of thing? What kind of sand paper? Sorry that I'm a complete newb at this. lol.

Any tips or suggestions for a new modeler would be appreciated. Thanks.

Taugan

I've heard lots of problems with Hobbywarrior. Best bet is to avoid them from now on. Most recasts I've seen had their share of flaws and problems. especially if they are done from typical thai resin. it's much heavier and a lot more brittle than good resin.

Masa sells some pretty nice originals for great prices next tie you're in the market ;)

make sure you wash your kits really well with at least dish soap and warm water before you do anything with them. i have an old toothbrush i use to give them a good scrubbing to make sure theres no mold release left on the pieces. some people use stronger stuff but i haven't found need to go stronger than Dawn dish soap yet :hehe:

primer is pretty much a must. besides giving a better surface for your paint to stick to, it also can help bring any flaws to your attention. prep work is probably the most time consuming part of building most of the time.

if there are chips, you can sometimes fix them with a 2 part epoxy putty. i usually just pick up some plumbers putty from the hardware store. its usually about $3 for a tube of it. just mix equal parts A & B and you're good to go. there's usually only a 5 minute work time with it so don't mix up more than you need. then just go through the normal sanding motions, ect.

i'm sure others will have more tips and suggestions for materials but thats how i do it :keke:

Taugan
08-30-2006, 07:34 PM
Thanks for the tips Ari. I knew you'd probably be the first to jump on my post. lol.

Couple more questions... These models come in pieces (Obviously). Any specific type of glue I should be using? (Or do I use glue at all?)

I noticed that people who make the models form them pretty much whole... (Torso and Head mainly) - then they cut them. Why is this important? Wouldn't it be easier to leave the pieces together than cutting them apart then putting them back together again?

Taugan

Arieanna
08-30-2006, 09:55 PM
Thanks for the tips Ari. I knew you'd probably be the first to jump on my post. lol.

Couple more questions... These models come in pieces (Obviously). Any specific type of glue I should be using? (Or do I use glue at all?)

I noticed that people who make the models form them pretty much whole... (Torso and Head mainly) - then they cut them. Why is this important? Wouldn't it be easier to leave the pieces together than cutting them apart then putting them back together again?

Taugan


if the wires you use for pinning the pieces are snug, sometimes you don't need the glue. generally the combination of glue and the wire makes a stonger bond which is better, especially on a lot of the heavier joints.

as far as sculpting the figures, making them in one piece at first is usually easier to get them looking right. cutting them apart before molding and casting is generally for ease of casting and masking/painting. ive noticed japanese GKs tend to have more pieces than their american counterparts. when it comes to putting together extra pieces of hair, ect id rather do that than try to mask and paint around the faces. hehe