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Willow
08-22-2005, 08:17 AM
Does anyone know of any tutorials or has made a tutorial on how to create the perfect skin tone? Not too orange, not too pale, but just right.....

TIA

Masa
08-22-2005, 09:17 AM
I don't know about "perfect", but I like the technique used by Roughness http://www86.sakura.ne.jp/~first_fast/Column/04.htm If this is for your Sakaki fig, then it should get you pretty close. Order some Gunze Character Flesh 1, Clear Yellow and Clear Orange. Primer or basecoat with white, then spray the clear yellow/clear orange mixture into all the crevices and shadow areas. Afterwards, you just need to mist the Character Flesh 1 over the entire kit. Done :)
After you get more used to mixing paints, you might try and mix your own flesh colors, but for starting out, the technique above should give you some good results.

Joa
08-22-2005, 10:50 AM
Well, Kelly..
There are as many techniques as there are modellers / painters.
The best way is to experiment, but if you're impatient here are a few pointers:

-prime the kit white.
then...
-basic flesh tone color (most brands carry a color named "flesh" or skin)
Add a drop or two of reddish brown to get the basic darkest color for the kit.
Paint all *shadowy* areas with it, undersides of body parts and such.
At times I paint all the kit with this blend...
-Use this basic blend and add white, burnt umber, raw sienna, yellows, greens and whatnot to reach the desired uniform skin tone.
If you airbrush, here it's vital that you add a pigment thinning medium in order to get that seamless transition from dark to light. The key word is Layers. Work yourself up to the tone you want.
-Highlights. Add more white and more thinning medium and top the *high* spots with it. Again, L A Y E R S.

Also, there's always my hero Cody Kwok (who inspired me to finally hack and slash a kit; Casca) and his awesome tutorials for beginners and pro's alike: http://codyscoop.com/howto.html

Good Luck!

FilmMkr
08-22-2005, 12:04 PM
I agree about Cody, but my hero is RedRage! He has an awesome skin tone recipe that I use for all of my work these days.

Willow
08-22-2005, 05:17 PM
Thank you both for your tips and resources. I am going to Sticky this thread so that other members can benefit from all the wisdom here :)

Joa
08-22-2005, 05:50 PM
I agree about Cody, but my hero is RedRage! He has an awesome skin tone recipe that I use for all of my work these days.


*hint, hint* and that would be...¿ ;)

FilmMkr
08-23-2005, 10:08 PM
Sorry - I've been on a shoot for two days.

I'll find it Joa, or maybe Rage can post it himself!

FM

redrage
08-23-2005, 10:17 PM
Sorry, been rather busy with work this week: let me see if I can find it otherwise I'll rewrite it and post it here. It's basically the same concept that Joa uses except rather than working from the middle, I (always) work from lightest to darkest and build things up in successively darker layers. (Think watercolor illustration. You can't go lighter in traditional watercolor painting; only darker) It's a by-product from my career training but its comfortable for me.

Hey, whatever works for you right? ;)

TTFN

FilmMkr
08-24-2005, 09:17 AM
Here 'ya go:

RedRage’s Skin Tone Recipe


(All colors are Delta Creamcoat):

Old Parchment
Tangerine
Fire Red
Burnt Sienna
Burnt Umber
White
Creamcoat Thinner

I mix up a base tone using about 1 part parchment (or unbleached titanium white), 1 part tangerine (orange) and about 3 parts or more of pure white. I mix up a bunch of this because it will serve as the basis for everything else.

For the successively darker tones (increases) I will mix this base with a mixture of 1 part burnt sienna to 1 part burnt umber. You will vary the ratio of the base to the dark tone to get the darker increases. I will typically do 2 or 3 increases; your contrast in the paints can be kind of coarse because you will be feathering it out with the airbrush when you apply it.

Most of the military painter’s I hang with (and my life painting teacher from college) really prefer to only use umbers, siennas, and primaries for skin tones bases but I’m into using some pre-mixed oranges, pinks and yellows to get where I want to be. They are technically correct but it's a bit erudite for anime work; my way’s quicker.

Please remember that color theory is an art and not a hard and fast science and I don’t really have an alchemist recipe for color. They tend to evolve a little with each new kit but this is how I do it and will get you in the ballpark. I find that lately I’m liking a bit more orange and peach in my kits because it looks more like pin-up art from the 40’s and 70’s. I don’t limit myself to typical anime color schemes and I really don’t do “realistic” work either; it’s more like graphic art/ pin-up art I guess.
I’m done when I think it looks sexy.

FWIW When I am painting a kit I ALWAYS work lightest to darkest; it’s just my background in watercolor illustration I guess. It’s not the only way to do it but its how I am comfortable. If you spray yellow on a blue base you will get a different shade of green than you would if you sprayed them in the other order. Do what works best for you.

(BTW Remember that when you thin Delta to use their brand of airbrush thinner about 50/50 to pigment; I like to mix my paints pre-thinned)

EYES:

FWIW I would line the eyes; even male, military figures get definition in this area. It doesn't have to be harsh but some addtional deliniation is very helpful to make it read. I like to use a charcoal grey artist ink with a touch of gold dry pearl added; it yields a lovely mocha color for realistic female figues with just a touch of sheen.
This is the recipe that I use, and I am very pleased with the results!

Film

redrage
08-24-2005, 10:35 PM
...and the image.

http://www.gkjapan.com/gallery/files/7/smlcolors_1.jpg

crazedpanda
04-10-2008, 04:35 PM
Filmy, I read all of your WIPs over at the FF boards, and was wondering on your experience with the Lifetones series of paints. You seemed really pleased with them, so I just wanted to get your official opinion of them and how they compare with other acrylic paints.

Also, on the Queen Nefer-Titty WIP I saw a picture of the Porsche that has a wide assortment of acrylic paints behind it. I have only painted two kits so far (both Gundam) and have recently gotten into GKs and was hoping to get some advice on acrylic paints from the pros :happy:

I've only worked with Tamiya acrylics so far and with all of the really nice paint jobs that I've seen on GKs I was wondering which types of acrylic paints to go with. So far I've seen people mention Liquitex (not sure which specific one out of their extensive line of paints), Delta Creamcoats, as well as Createx (not sure about transparent or opaque?). Thanks in advance for the help and sorry if this is a bit off topic :sweat:

FilmMkr
04-11-2008, 07:50 AM
The Porsche photo is from a seven page feature article that I did for the latest Scale Auto (http://www.scaleautomag.com/) magazine called Awesome Acrylics. It is all about working with acrylics, including mix ratios, compressor settings, airbrush distances, etc. Also includes working with pearls, Future, and a cabinet full of my tips and tricks for working with pastels, washes, and much more.

You can find Scale Auto at Borders, Barnes and Noble, and book stores and hobby shops everywhere.

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-Open.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-14.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-2.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-3.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-7.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-8.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-9.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-3b.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-11.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-12.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a176/FilmMkr/Cars%20and%20Bikes/Porsche%20Cayman/Cayman-10.jpg

DOJO
08-02-2008, 02:01 PM
I don't know about "perfect", but I like the technique used by Roughness http://www86.sakura.ne.jp/~first_fast/Column/04.htm If this is for your Sakaki fig, then it should get you pretty close. Order some Gunze Character Flesh 1, Clear Yellow and Clear Orange. Primer or basecoat with white, then spray the clear yellow/clear orange mixture into all the crevices and shadow areas. Afterwards, you just need to mist the Character Flesh 1 over the entire kit. Done :)
After you get more used to mixing paints, you might try and mix your own flesh colors, but for starting out, the technique above should give you some good results.

Hope you can help me out a little bit as I see you mention the clear colors technique. Been searching online for some time now and can't find information that i need. I want to understand the theory of the clear color (wash,paint...)
Just want to read more it, to understand it better.

thanks.

Masa
08-02-2008, 11:27 PM
Hope you can help me out a little bit as I see you mention the clear colors technique. Been searching online for some time now and can't find information that i need. I want to understand the theory of the clear color (wash,paint...)
Just want to read more it, to understand it better.

thanks.

I'm not sure what the history of the method is, but I first heard of it from some pro finishers who developed a style that sped up the painting process for them. Later, the description showed up in model magazines and some sites on the net. Not sure if this will help, but I'll pass along what I know at least :sweat:

The way that most modelers paint skin tones is by working with different shades of flesh. Dark shade of flesh for shadow areas, Medium shade for a base tone, and a Light shade for highlights. Colors are applied by working from dark to light or light to dark, or even from the middle tone out.

The clear method speeds up the flesh painting process by eliminating the need for mixing different shades of colors and changing paints multiple times during the application process. You only need to mix one color - a clear transparent orange and apply that color in varying amounts to tint the white surface of the figure. Spray heavily for shadow areas, lightly for medium areas, and just mist for highlights. Another advantage of using this method is the finish is highly translucent and very "skin-like" if done correctly.

The formula for the color is (a dab of clear red, a dab of clear yellow, and clear). Add a drop of clear blue for realistic figures or a drop of hot pink for a younger, more rosy flesh. I've mixed my own and also tried just using clear orange and the results are pretty similar. You'll just have to experiment and see what works best for you.

This is in-progress, but you can see the skin tones developing with the various amounts of clear colors on the white background.

http://www.gkjapan.com/gallery/files/8/haruhi.JPG

Here you can see the colors used by Tandem Twin. White, clear orange, hot pink, clear blue.

http://www.gkjapan.com/gallery/files/8/colorsforflesh.jpg

Here is the piece after being shot with the mixture.

http://www.gkjapan.com/gallery/files/8/tandemtwinflesh.jpg

DOJO
08-03-2008, 05:43 PM
Thanks Masa,

Thank you for the information. From what i remember reading, if you make a mistake you have to re-paint everything from the start, there's not way to fix it?

What about using different colors on a same surface? For example i need to have a red and green which are opposite color and i can understand if they will over lap it wont be good. Is there a way to use multiple color with the clear color technique?

Masa
08-08-2008, 06:36 AM
Thanks Masa,

Thank you for the information. From what i remember reading, if you make a mistake you have to re-paint everything from the start, there's not way to fix it?

You can cover some mistakes by misting white again, but it would probably depend on how far along you are in the process. Because it's such a quick method, it would probably be quicker to just strip and repaint it.


What about using different colors on a same surface? For example i need to have a red and green which are opposite color and i can understand if they will over lap it wont be good. Is there a way to use multiple color with the clear color technique?

Not sure I understand what you are trying to do - is this still pertaining to the skin tone? Maybe a photo of what you have in mind would help?

DOJO
08-08-2008, 11:15 PM
I want to use this technique not on skin.

here's what i want to do
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1129/909214243_2368235df3.jpg?v=0

Masa
08-09-2008, 12:23 AM
I want to use this technique not on skin.

here's what i want to do
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1129/909214243_2368235df3.jpg?v=0

Ewww... (I'm not an insect guy myself :sweat: )

Hmm... I don't see why you couldn't do it. I would airbrush the transparent greens since they have the most coverage, and then just handbrush the transparent reddish brown sections. The colors might be affected by the underlying layers, so just adjust the tint until you get close to the color you want. After you're done, just hit the surface with a high gloss clear and it should look pretty close.

DOJO
08-09-2008, 02:11 PM
have to re type, pressed the wrong button 8((

But if I'm going to apply red on top of the green it would turn out a nasty brown color. Like mixing regular red and green color, no?

"adjust the tint" what do you mean by that?

Masa
08-09-2008, 09:24 PM
have to re type, pressed the wrong button 8((

But if I'm going to apply red on top of the green it would turn out a nasty brown color. Like mixing regular red and green color, no?

"adjust the tint" what do you mean by that?

You'll have to compensate for the tint. If you use red over the green, it will turn brown. So you adjust the color before you apply it - I would try adding more yellow first. Test it on some scrap first and see how the results come out.

DOJO
12-12-2008, 11:52 PM
Tried to use the clear color today. I think the color was a bit "strong".
Would like to know a second opinion.

Masa
12-13-2008, 02:49 AM
I don't know how close that is to your original intentions... but that looks wicked cool - almost like glazed ceramic.

Seeing the piece now... you might actually fare better by painting matte colors on the kit, then covering that with gloss/semi-gloss until you get the right look to the surface :hmm:

DOJO
12-13-2008, 10:11 AM
I wanted to learn/try to do the skin painting with clear colors.
You are rght that it's very glossy. Will give it an other coat of satin clear.

MidZ
12-14-2008, 11:00 AM
Glazed ceramic is the first thing that pops to mind. It's so smooth ans shiny :)
Painting skin tones with clear colors is HARD. I also suggest you use flat matte colors first. Unless you intended the skin to look 'wet', flat/matte colors is your best choice for skin tones.

You can try and color the shaded area with clear orange and then brush on the matte skin tone over (and over and over) it. Anything that is glossy can be killed by a dull coat.